Annual predictions have been heralding ‘The Year of Video’ for so long that most of us have given up counting – but last year, it certainly seemed to me that brand adoption of video content marketing really matured, in an unprecedented way.

What has become clear with this sophistication is that one-size-fits-all is no longer an option. What works on Twitter is less likely to be as effective on Facebook, based on the respective audience’s preferences and consumption habits. Similarly, Snapchat and Instagram (Stories) also demand their own approach, catering for the demographic of each.

Facebook Live was a real hit last year – with people watching Live content on the network for up to three times longer on average than the traditional video upload. 2016 saw many music marketers, celebrities and sports promoters taking full advantage of the additional reach and resulting engagement that this continues to offer. Consequently, we helped our clients to capitalise on this trend, creating campaigns for brands such as Habitat and Sony Mobile to take full advantage of Facebook Live:

Elsewhere in Facebook, traditional engagement metrics (comments, likes and shares) still have the biggest impact on the reach of a piece of video content. Specifically, engagement enhances reach, which in turn increases the number of people that see that content, whether it’s clicked on or played automatically.

Also, we saw that over 90% of Facebook videos are now watched without sound – which is both a creative barrier and an opportunity, if properly thought about within the video strategy.Elsewhere, we’ve seen an increase in client demand not only for traditional, filmed and edited video content, but also for animations. Each of which has worked well at appropriate times.

Elsewhere, we’ve seen an increase in client demand not only for traditional, filmed and edited video content, but also for animations. Each of which has worked well at appropriate times.

Similarly, Cinemagraphs and GIFs continue to proliferate – still often cited as ‘thumb-stoppers’ – they work superbly as short content, ideal for mobile consumption. Take this example from Barclays Business UK:

One thing is certain – the days of a ‘hit-and-hope’ video marketing strategy are long gone. Whether video content is conversational, narrative, or overtly self-promotional, there is a real knack to developing distilled, brand-focussed assets for social sharing and consumption.

Now we’re back and getting stuck into 2017, our creative team are already on-task and looking at new tactics to help our clients stand out from the crowd in an ever-more noisy social environment. Drop us a line if you’d like to chat through how we can help you explore the right strategic fit for your business.